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Another guest recipe! This time from the multi-talented James Snaith who today has put his pen down and turns his hand to some mouthwatering burgers (cue ever so relevant comment about horse meat …)

Why make my own burgers when it’s possible to get high quality ones from the local butchers and supermarket far cheaper? The best you can buy, “off the shelf” so to speak, are “premium” burgers with 90% meat content – that means there’s 10% of something else, 10% “filler material” to bulk it out, bread, flavourings, salt, preservatives. As I say, those are the premium burgers … your ordinary everyday burgers can have an actual meat content of less than 60%.

Sometimes it’s nice to know what you’re eating, and remove the doubt of all the filler material to make a burger that’s tasty and not pumped full of additives.

The recipe below acts as a great template to make the sort of burgers that you like. To spice things up, finely chop a deseeded chilli or add a teaspoon of chilli powder instead of oregano. For a different flavour burger, add finely chopped sundried tomatoes or mushrooms. Instead of 2 beaten egg yolks, just use one and 100g of grated cheese. Add a teaspoon of Worcestershire Sauce, or a tablespoon of Dijon mustard.

The raw burgers can be frozen after being made. Make sure to defrost completely before cooking.

If grilling on a BBQ, rest in a fridge for at least 30 mins before cooking after making.

The following will make four quarter pound burgers, or eight smaller.

Ingredients

  • 500g minced meat (beef, lamb, pork, turkey or chicken – bear in mind poultry has less fat content so will be slightly drier than red meat)
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 2 egg yolks, beaten
  • 1 tbsp dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp oil (vegetable, corn, olive – whichever you use for shallow frying is good)

Base ingredients

Base ingredients

Method

Fry the onion and garlic until the onion starts to caramelize and then remove from heat and allow to cool. Mix together with the other ingredients in a large bowl, using your fingers to work the mixture.

Beefy goodness

Beefy goodness

Split the mix into four/eight and roll into balls, giving each a good hard squeeze as you do (to help bind them), and then flatten out until roughly burger patty shaped.

Place on a cling-film covered plate and cover with cling-film and allow to rest for 10-20 mins to rest. (Tip: you can use one extra-long sheet of cling-film and double it over.)

Chilling

Chilling

To cook, heat a tablespoon of oil in a preheated flat bottomed pan and fry the patties on a medium heat, turning every few minutes until cooked through. Alternatively you can cook them on a preheated griddle pan.

Be careful when turning as, unlike processed burgers, these will be a little more fragile. (It’s quite normal for bits to fall off when cooking, don’t worry if you lose a little bit that way.)

Fry cook

Fry cook

After cooking, allow to stand for five mins to rest before serving.

As a suggestion, serve with a toasted bread roll and a mixed side salad. Will feed four to eight people.

Plated up

Plated up

 

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